Herbal Education: the Aromatic Apothecary

Listen to our lecture “Joyful Herbs for Darker Days: Using herbs from our aromatic apothecary to stay joyful and inspired through the winter season” with Clinical Herbalist Guido Masé RH(AHG) of the Vermont Center for Integrative Herbalism and Urban Moonshine.

Motherwort (Leonurus cardiaca):

A wild, weedy mint family plant traditionally used to calm the heart and spirit.  Said to promote courage and resilience when faced with overwhelming events – such as those experienced by new mothers!

~ ~ ~

You can find more free lectures on Herbal Bitters & Tonics recorded here!

  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Tension & Anxiety Support for Modern Life

Aromatic Herbs: Uplift the Spirit and Gladden the Heart
Tension and Anxiety Support for Modern Life
Guido Masé, RH (AHG) 2012

In today’s world of tight schedules, constant communication, and high-speed movement we often find ourselves disconnected from what matters most, from what truly brings us joy. Whether from an endless to-do list or a lack of time spent quietly outdoors, our spirit is endlessly stimulated and yet feels dissatisfied, unsettled, and sometimes even sad. In a different time, we might have retreated to the corner of a scented garden to find a moment’s peace and solace, but without such a refuge readily available, internal tension can manifest as anxiety, irritability, and sleeplessness – or leave us feeling overwhelmed, uninspired, fatigued, and unhappy. It is a malaise that has been creeping up on us in these modern times.

There are so many options set forth to cure this malaise: sedatives for anxiety and insomnia, stimulants for apathy and sluggishness, narcotics, alcohol and other drugs to escape. We find concentrated extracts of botanicals like kava or St. Johnswort – powerful remedies that carry some warnings and are not necessarily the right choice for everyone. Researchers are always looking for the next “blockbuster” drug to help those suffering from depression and anxiety, but many of these choices have problematic side effects as well – from sexual dysfunction to weight gain. Not exactly the best way to heal an uninspired spirit!

Herbalists have an entire class of plants – the nervines – that can help support a balanced state of internal tension, nourish the mind and spirit, and thereby bring joy to frazzled days and restorative sleep to restless nights. They have been used for thousands of years: from the incenses and infused wines of Egypt and China, to the warming mulling spices served on a winter’s night. They are generally highly scented plants, rich in volatile oils, and are as safe as a cup of chamomile tea (still used today to soothe a worried, colicky child). Many are standby features of aromatic gardens: lemon balm, lavender, rose and mugwort in the temperate zones, and lemongrass, cardamom, holy basil and jasmine in tropical climates. Just like a retreat into the garden itself, these fragrant herbs are a time-honored and effective way to gently rebalance internal tension without being habit forming, intoxicating, or sedating.

The chemistry of these plants goes to work on our heart and arteries, relaxing their state of tension and improving circulation to the hands and feet. The molecules responsible for the aromatic quality of the nervine herbs are also great at relaxing our bellies, urinary systems, and the smooth muscle that makes up the uterus. Thus they feature in remedies for stress and nervousness, unfocused and scattered personalities, worry and sleeplessness and – believe it or not – menstrual cramping! Beyond this, one cannot overestimate the havoc that chronic stress wreaks upon us: over time, the effort of maintaining such a high state of tension can make us feel sluggish, apathetic, and withdrawn – in a word, depressed. The aromatic, nervine plants are a blessing in two ways: they help keep our anxiety and worry in check on a day-to-day basis, but can also re-enliven us when we feel sad and despondent. Think of a bouquet of flowers from a friend: it’s hard to stay upset, closed within your shell, when presented with such a fragrant gift!

In the Czech Republic, the linden tree is sacred. In fact, this tree – whose incredibly sweet-smelling flowers bloom almost the entire month of July – features on traditional currencies, flags, and palace insignia. It is rumored that in order to maintain an even temper and render swift and just judgment, all legal proceedings in the rural villages are still conducted under a linden. The flower tea is a national beverage, though it is also prized from Provence to Scandinavia. Here in the darker, colder reaches of northern Europe, country folk rely on linden (and other aromatic nervines such as lemon balm and rose) to lift their moods during the long stretches of night at the heart of winter. When the sun barely peeks above the horizon for an hour or two, the scented herbs recall the garden’s summer delights, and give us that moment’s retreat that can make all the difference when the spirit feels low, disconnected, and undernourished.

If you look around, you might see that this very traditional practice is missing from our modern lives. Yet it seems so important, and so easy! When we cannot visit a garden for renewal, perhaps we can re-learn to cultivate our own inner gardens with the sweet-scented nervine plants. In doing so we will see tension melt away, relieve the weight of worry, and inspire a depressed spirit. Rest will come more easily, and creativity will be enhanced. Our stress might then become a challenge to meet and overcome with grace and joy – and all this using safe, aromatic, nourishing herbs that have been a part of the human experience for thousands of years. Aromatic nervines are still a delicious, refreshing cure for our modern malaise.

Guido Masé is a clinical herbalist, herbal educator, and garden steward specializing in holistic Western herbalism, though his approach is eclectic and draws upon many influences. Guido works clinically and teaches at the Vermont Center for Integrative Herbalism, holds the position of Clinical Herbalist on staff at Urban Moonshine, is a professional member of the American Herbalists Guild, and is a part of United Plant Savers and the American Botanical Council. — This article is brought to you by Urban Moonshine, makers of Joy Tonic, an aromatic blend for calm and inspiration!

For the list of references, click here!

  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Herbalist James Green: In Harmony Herbs, CA

James Green
Herbalist, Author, Teacher

If you have studied or been mildly interested in using herbs as medicine in the United States, you have probably heard of James.  If you haven’t, then your teacher certainly has.  James is known for co-pioneering the Herbal Community in the US with many of the renowned herbalists that influence us all so greatly today.  He is the author of  The Herbal Medicine-Maker’s Handbook and The Male Herbal: The Definitive Health Care book for Men & Boys, and has been a practicing herbalist for 50 years!  Currently, James spends time in San Diego as an Active Creative Herbalist at In Harmony Herbs and Spices, partner-in-health to owner Jodi Shagg.  We are honored to have James as today’s guest blogger!

~ ~ ~

Off the top of your head tell us 3 things that bring you Joy?
1) Puppies and kitties, what could be cuter?
2) Uplifting others
3) Chocolate

James’ Mother and pup Tibet

What do you do in the winter to keep your spirits up?
Interesting that you ask this – I’ve lived in the NW and I just don’t let things bother me. I don’t let little things get me down. I appreciate both life and death.  When I was born, mom was so small, so the doctor told her she may not live. My mom had this notion that if I was born at night she would die, or if I was born during the day she would live.  Turns out that I came right in the middle of the shortest day of the year, and my mom survived.  Made my mom happy at my birth and have kept it going.  I’m definitely a winter baby!

Where’s you favorite place to sit and relax, and what would we find next to you?
Well, I’d have to go back to my youth, would be on a nice warm day, on a beach, on the nice warm sand, on a towel… after surfing, watching the seagulls and the surf. Reading and writing, both.  Blissin’ out in my mind and writing it down.

Sage blissin’ out

What’s the first thing in your bag of tricks to cheer up a friend?
I see them in their health and happiness in my mind, creating vibrations that see them in their happy, true state – and I hold that.  Just like when working with clients: seeing the happy, joyful person.  It gives them a place to come up to.  Health is the natural place to be.  Also a compliment and a cup of Damiana tea.

Favorite way to get inspired?
Daydream. When I was a teacher (I taught 4th -12th grades) and I saw a kid daydreaming, I let them be. When you daydream, you’re getting in touch with the creative and the place where you feel good. You start creating at that point, higher vibrations, in line with spirit.

Favorite aromatic herb?
Himalayan Cedar – one that Jodi turned me on to.  And Jasmine!

What do you use Joy Tonic for?!
How can I go beyond the name? Gonna see it and knock that back! I use it as a tonic. Tonics are the way to go. Joy Tonic is delightful.

James also loves Urban Moonshine bitters!  A little spray of bitters “and you can’t stay depressed…Gets everything going!…We really need to appreciate bitter taste.”  The Male Herbal contains a chapter all about bitter!

James invited us to share his poem “Body Built by Starlight”,which was first published in The Male Herbal.  He and Jodi thought you would enjoy it!

~ ~ ~

“Body Built of Starlight”

I am human being
child of an impeccable God
body built of starlight
heart crypts full with feelings that monitor my mind.

I am creator, my life my medium, my masterpiece
Unfolding my contribution to eternity.
Formed and transformed by the passion of my desires,
my choices made, make me who I am.
Remaining therefore never the same, I am forever free.

Composed and brought forth by the diversity of my desire,
Zealous to know everything
I am now as I have never been before, nor will ever be again;
None other has been where I am, nor will any ever be.

Unfettered lifestreams of light my brothers, my sisters,
your lives and mine playfully entwine,
and my heart smiles upon the brilliance of your creations,
for ones lust for life is like none other.

I am a child of the Universe
born of a prodigal Goddess
body built of starlight
heart beats full with feelings that monitor my mind.
Treading freedom’s celestial turf my perspective weaves invisible paths
Known solely by an inner self, a silent self, guru to my heart.

Immersed joy bound in the promised pleasures of divine heritage
…Laughter touching me everywhere in a Universe unlocked…
I am inquisitor
brother of All Life
visionary mind dancing eagerbright forever transforming starlight,
singing my chosen words to Creation’s inner symphonies,
seeking answers to questions I’ve yet to ask,
for I am, and I am insatiable, and I must know
that I shall be, eternally.

~ ~ ~

When in San Diego, make sure to stop by In Harmony Herbs & Spices and support these two amazing herbalists!  We are so grateful for all they both do to bring Plants to the People!

[All photos copyright Jodi Shagg 2012.  This interview was scribed by Amy Trynoski.]

  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Herbalist Larken Bunce: Back to the Heart

Today I headed to the city to do some urban wild-crafting. There were rumors of an unsprayed stand of hawthorn with October-ripening fruit–far later than any of the wilder country cousins I’m used to (Crataegus phaenopyrum, a student suggests). My partner in crime and I found the trees heavily laden with the brightest, shiniest fruits either of us had ever seen. No worm-eaten, misshapen haws here. These looked more like tiny, glossy tomatoes. We were giddy counting dozens of trees, tidily planted in mulch. Not a single snarl of raspberry canes would waylay us as we gathered our loot, perched on upturned buckets plucking with fingers and snips.

As our baskets filled, we nibbled the mild, sweet flesh of the berries, spitting seeds and discussing recipes for preparing our harvest. Occasionally passersby would inquire about our project, kindly curious and even willing to munch a berry with us. Periodic stabbings with formidable two-inch thorns kept us focused–returning us frequently to quiet picking.

Then a pleasant breeze would pick up and the unusual warmth of this late October day would get us marveling about our fortune. And again, we were back to plotting our hawthorn preparations. Perhaps we’d make a simple hawthorn, brandy and honey cordial, to be served in ornate sipping glasses on chilly evenings by the fire; maybe a concentrated jam with cranberries and orange peel to spread on toast with a big mug of tea; or a rough chutney with crabapples, rosehips, blackberries, honey and ginger to serve warm with ice cream or Sunday pancakes. After an hour of steady picking filled our baskets, our imaginations woke our bellies and it was time for a late lunch.

Returning home, the late afternoon was still fair. I pressed my sweetheart into service as a berry-stripper. All of those juicy orbs needed to be separated from stems and leaves before being dunked in alcohol or simmered on the stove. We sat on our deck in the dying light, berries dropping into bowls by the sticky handful. We let silence hang between us as the wind rustled through our leaf piles and squirrels called to each other in the woods. When our fingers got chilled we moved inside and started a fire.

Now, I’m crafting recipes, thinking of which flavors my family and friends might like best, whether they’d rather a present of booze or breakfast treat, or perhaps with a purely medicinal item. And medicine they are, these fruits. Packed with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory flavonoids, they’re prime medicine for the cardiovascular system. Strengthening the contraction of the heart and the integrity of blood vessel walls, a daily dose can prevent cardiovascular disease and reduce blood pressure. As medicine for our spirits, hawthorn gives us “heart”, cools and disperses over-hot emotions and soothes anxious minds. I’m thinking of these qualities as I blend with other flavonoid-rich fruits, stimulating spices and nutritious raw honey.

~ ~ ~

What brings me joy? What helps me move gracefully from one season to the next? It’s the way that relationship with plants calls me back to friendship, family and love, back to the heart of being human. It’s a stolen day to play and giggle with my dear friend, our attentions glued to the present like children. It’s the quiet moment shared with my partner at the end of the day, at the end of another year of tending our land together. And it’s the opportunity to bring my loved ones to mind, to imagine how the work of my hands might contribute to their health, or simply bring them a smile. When I stop to notice how my world changes on a day like today, I realize I’m relaxed, connected and grateful. I realize all over again–and it happens every time–that maybe more than anything, it’s the plants that keep me tethered to the cycles of real and rich life, thorns and all.

Larken Bunce, MS

Larken is a clinical herbalist, teaching and practicing at Vermont Center for Integrative Herbalism, a non-profit educational organization that she co-directs with Betzy Bancroft and Guido Masé. She also serves as faculty in the Health Arts and Sciences program at Goddard College.

  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Herbalist Brendan Kelly: Winter Yin

Brendan Kelly, MAc, LAc

Brendan is an herbalist of 19 years with training in eastern and western healing traditions.  He was the founder and primary instructor of an outdoor based western herbal school in southern Vermont, and teaches about harvesting and using wild plants for food and medicine, and herbal medicine preparation in a wide variety of settings   He teaches about various aspects of Chinese medicine as well as western herbal medicine at schools, universities, educational centers and conferences around the US.  He also writes and teaches about the connection between personal, societal and environmental wellbeing, including the connection between climate change and Chinese medical thought and diagnosis (with a book in the near future!!)  He is also the current president of the Vermont Acupuncture Association.

~ ~ ~

Off the top of your head tell us 3 things that bring you Joy?
1) having the chance to be of help to people
2) the understandings of who I am, and the expression of that in the world
3) nature and my wife!!

What do you do in the winter to keep your spirits up?
That is a great question – a big thing that I do in the winter is to recognize that it’s cold and dark in the winter.  From the Chinese view its more of a yin time.  In some ways we will have less energy, less strength, drive, and yang in the winter – and that’s not unhealthy, that’s natural!  So part of the way to maintain through the winter is to realize this, and not to resist or fight it.  Summer is more of a yang time: sunnier, brighter, joy is more on the surface, its more readily available.  In the winter its less available, but its there!!  Go with that rhythm – a way to maintain joy the whole year is to go with the rhythm.  Folks affected by Seasonal Affective Disorder may have a lack of yang and internal warmth.  Sometimes what people are actually feeling in winter, is winter!!!  Part of what I think sustains joy is realizing that joy is more concentrated and dense – a time to rest more, sleep more, though I don’t always exceed at the last part…

Where’s you favorite place to sit and relax, and what would we find next to you?
I haven’t been doing very much of that … one favorite place is anywhere where my wife is.  Another place would be outside – anywhere that’s natural with plants and trees, including cultivated plants and trees.  And I particularly like water, I like to sit next to water and observe plants next to water.  With me you’d find my wife, or anyone who’s interested in being there and certainly anyone interested in plants.

What’s the first thing in your bag of tricks to cheer up a friend?
Listening and trying to relate to their situation.  Most of us have experienced most things in life.  Whatever that friend is going through, I relate it to a similar experience that I’ve had.

Favorite way to get inspired?
Right now it would be sleeping more, which I plan to do tonight!  In general I think it’s a really important trying to understand who I am and what I’m supposed to be doing – that day, that month, that year – and trying really to express that.  We’re all here to do certain things and find real lasting joy by finding out who we are and then expressing that in the world and sharing that with other people.

Favorite aromatic herb?
Currently:  Chang Pu (Acori spp.) “Sweet flag” – very aromatic!  From the Chinese view, it’s one of the few herbs that is in the category of “opens orifice” – the upper orifice, ie sense of smell, hearing, sight, perception.  It actually opens that and refines that and clears out any gunk that could be muddling that.

And Rosemary – I think rosemary can be used in a very similar way.  We have lots of Rosemary plants that we just took in to our house  from their outside summering

What do you use Joy Tonic for?
I use it right now to answer these questions, and to help lift my Qi from being too busy during the past weeks.

Brendan and his wife Liz Geran own Jade Mountain Wellness in Burlington, Vermont where they provide Acupuncture and Natural Health Services.  Brendan also led seasonal Urban Herb Walks for us this year!

  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Herbalist Guido Mase: Aromatic Forest-Bathing

Guido Masé   RH(AHG)

Guido Masé is a clinical herbalist, herbal educator, and garden steward specializing in holistic Western herbalism, though his approach is eclectic and draws upon many influences. Guido works clinically and teaches at the Vermont Center for Integrative Herbalism, holds the position of Clinical Herbalist on staff at Urban Moonshine, is a professional member of the American Herbalists Guild, and is a part of United Plant Savers and the American Botanical Council.

 ~ ~ ~

The arrival of fall has been dramatic this year! A warm, dry summer has moved quickly to cooler, shorter days that have rolled in on clouds and storms. Perfect, I say – the forest takes on a whole new air, rich and wet, smelling more of fallen leaves and fern as the season progresses.

It may be that I feel melancholic at this time of year, or that the woods seem so timeless and magical, but a long hike is the perfect medicine when I start bemoaning the missing sunlight. At first, green barely blushes, though the season has changed. Then, the gold and orange, interspersed with stands of evergreen, blanket the hillsides. Trail walks become lit up with a unique light, better even than the shade that comes when the forest first blooms in spring. It’s hard not to feel renewal and joy here – in spite of the early sunset. I start to look forward to the crisp days to come. When it comes right down to it, the woods are good medicine in any season.

It’s interesting to note that in Japan, the practice of walking in the forest and breathing the air is formally known as “shinrin-yoku” or “forest-bathing”. It is considered an important aromatic experience. Researchers have examined its effects: a simple walk in the woods lowers blood pressure and heart rate, reduces levels of the stress hormone cortisol, and tempers nerve activity in the fight-or-flight centers of the brain. Good medicine indeed. So as the days get cooler, I actually find myself in the woods more often than in summer (when the riot of garden and field holds its sway). And after a long day’s hike, back home to the fire, Joy tonic and seltzer, and good friends: renewed, inspired, and making plans for winter’s adventures!

~ ~ ~

What brings Herbalist Guido Masé joy ::

Off the top of your head tell us 3 things that bring you Joy?
1) My daughter
2) Running
3) Patterns – hidden connections

What do you do in the winter to keep your spirits up?
Get outside daily! and fire.

Where’s you favorite place to sit and relax, and what would we find next to you?
It’s probably my desk. With a book, articles, or electronic versions thereof. But truly I am most relaxed when moving, not sitting – if by relaxed, you mean calm and focused. Woods walking or running are my favorites.

What’s the first thing in your bag of tricks to cheer up a friend?
Listening. Then, change of scenery.

Favorite way to get inspired?
Running, or music. Actually, running and music at the same time.

Favorite aromatic herb?
The Linden Tree – used to encourage a relaxed, open, even-tempered state. A unique and highly valued fragrance used throughout the world, but especially in the south of France and in central Europe where it is added to baths, sachets, and teacups.

What do you use Joy Tonic for?
I use it to help me start tasks and projects smoothly and productively. For me it’s often the beginning that is the most difficult step, and since having a big bottle of Joy Tonic around I find myself turning to it again and again as I sit down to write or be creative. My next biggest use is for celebrations.

~ ~ ~

Guido hosted a free herbal phone lecture Tuesday October 9th – check out the recording here!

“Joyful Herbs for Darker Days: Using herbs from our aromatic apothecary

to stay joyful and inspired through the winter season!”

  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Joy Interview with Jovial King, founder

Jovial King

Founder & CEO of Urban Moonshine

~ ~ ~

Off the top of your head, tell us 3 things that bring you joy:
1) My amazing girlfriends!
2) Travel. You name it I’m ready to go, passport in my pocket.
3) Urban Moonshine

What do you do in the Winter to keep your spirits up?
The winter in Vermont is long- a few things make it really enjoyable for me.  I love burning candles in the evenings as the days get darker, and having the the wood fire burning is crucial to my overall happiness!  I need to keep a strong connection with fire and light to keep my spirits up. Another must is having warm, nourishing meals- something baking in the oven or cooking on the stove brings me joy.  Hot aromatic baths are a go-to when I’m feeling down.  Lastly – a plane ticket to somewhere warm in the middle of winter!  I have to have something to look forward to when the sun goes down at 4pm and the thermometer is dipping below zero.

Where’s your favorite place to sit and relax, and what would we find next to you?
At home on my cozy couch looking out at the lake – with the New York Times and a pot of tea.

What’s the first thing in your bag of tricks to cheer up a friend?
Nothing cheers me up more than when someone brings me flowers, so that’s usually the first trick out of my bag – along with a good pep talk and a glass of wine.

Favorite way to get inspired?
Talking with my friends that are passionate and inspired about what they are doing!  That is absolutely contagious for me.

Favorite aromatic herb?
It’s so hard to choose!  I would say at this moment sage.  When I burn it the energy changes so dramatically.  I love the power it holds for clearing away what is no longer needed!  Clear space is important, and is the first step for making room for growth and change.

What do you use Urban Moonshine’s Joy Tonic for?
Everything. Ha! I use it when I need a shift in perspective.  If I’m feeling down or uninspired I’ll take it and it will lift the fog or the sadness.  It truly uplifts my heart and shifts my breathing in an amazing way.  I LOVE Joy Tonic!

~ ~ ~

Stay tuned for the complete series of Joy Interviews

with the Urban Moonshine Crew!

  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Joy Interview with Colleen Dando, alchemist

Colleen Dando

Head of Urban Moonshine’s Herbal Production

and “Aspiring Alchemist”

~ ~ ~

Off the top of your head tell us 3 things that bring you Joy?
1) Inspiring the love of plants and traditional medicine
2) Wild-crafting and making offerings to maintain the flow
3) Being outside, gardening, learning new skills, making up songs for my daughter, dancing and watching my daughter dance!

What do you do in the winter to keep your spirits up?
Maintain a connection with the Natural World and the Rhythms that are found outside of our control ~ Staying connected to that which is beyond our human experience ~ Honoring the seasonal shifts and moon cycles ~ Lighting candles to maintain the warmth and glow of the fire element ~ A sauna with aromatic oils ~ Bathing with salts and oils ~ Resting, laughing, writing poetry, baking with my daughter ~ Making little creations with the Season’s Harvest ~ Taking Winter “wonderland” walks in the woods, on dirt roads and through the fields ~ Listening to the birds and trying to identify the dormant plants.

Where’s you favorite place to sit and relax, and what would we find next to you?
Outside under a tree or some cozy place in nature, toting a little bag with a mini journal, camera, mugwort, sage and some fire.

What’s the first thing in your bag of tricks to cheer up a friend?
A spray of Rosewater, herbal treat, elixir or some home-spun creation… along with a hug and an ear ready to listen. Oh, and of course… a bottle of Joy. Seriously!

Favorite way to get inspired?
Doing something I love, learning something new, going for a run, deep breathing, morning meditation….

Favorite aromatic herb?
Herbs..!  My favorites are many! For me, aromatics are an essential.  One of the many gifts passed down from my mother has been her incredible sense of smell…which lends itself perfectly in my job! It’s amazing how my experience of an environment is greatly influenced by its aroma. Current aromatic herb lovings:
My internal anointing:  Tulsi, Calendula and Licorice tea… with a splash of Rosewater
Praises to the Air: Sweetgrass, Palo Santo, Japanese Incense(with sandalwood) and of course Sage
Everyday usage, right in my purse:  Organic Geranium essential oil, Rosewater spray

What do you use Joy Tonic for?
As a calming addition to a very full life! Not only for me, but for my Joyfully Spirited daughter…! And the best gift there is to give… Joy!

In alchemy, you must first make separate in order to bring together

~ ~ ~
Stay tuned for the complete series of Joy Interviews

with the Urban Moonshine Crew!

  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Joy Interview with Daiki Hirano, PALchemist

Daiki Hirano
Urban Moonshine Production Specialist
& Aspiring PALchemist

Off the top of your head tell us 3 things that bring you Joy?
1) riddums
2) my cat’s meow
3) the wind

What do you do in the winter to keep your spirits up?
Write haunting music. It sets me in vibration with a facet of winters memory which allows me to see winter and its cold and meet it with warmth

Where’s you favorite place to sit and relax, and what would we find next to you?
relax on the floor with some golden buds, book, music and cat, my feet and knees must be warm.

What’s the first thing in your bag of tricks to cheer up a friend?
The sun is up, the sky is blue its beautiful and so are you. The wind is low, the birds will sing that you are part of everything, won’t you open up your eyes? Look around you, it wont get any better. – Jesus said this

Favorite way to get inspired?  – Falling down

Favorite aromatic herb?  – Lemon balm

What do you use Joy Tonic for?  – Getting inspired!

 Daiki has been with Urban Moonshine for 2 years now!  At some point, the bottle of Moonshine you own was in this man’s hands.  Lucky you!

  • Facebook
  • Twitter